VETERINARIAN:If A Dog Lover... Become A Veterinarian! Find Out How?

blind man

BECAUSE SOME HEROES WEAR A LAB COAT INSTEAD OF A CAPE.In the world where nobody is compassionate towards animals, there are professionals who dedicate their whole lives to saving and protecting animals. They are epitomes of compassion and empathy. We hold immense respect for this selfless and noble profession. They are the voice of the voiceless. Let?s read more in detail.

WHAT IS VETERINARY?

  Veterinary is the branch of medicine that basically deals with finding, curing prevention of diseases on animals  

WHO IS VETERINARIAN?

A veterinarian (vet), also known as a veterinary surgeon or veterinary physician, is a professional who practices veterinary medicine by treating diseases, disorders, and injuries in non-human animals. Put simply, a veterinarian is a doctor who studies animal health; prevents, diagnoses, and treats diseases and health issues in animals; and helps protect the welfare of animals and people. Veterinarians are knowledgeable and well educated on many aspects of animal care and fulfill a range of roles across the private and public sectors. You can find veterinarians working at small animal clinics, emergency and specialty hospitals, universities, research facilities, pet food and drug manufacturing companies, and government organizations.

The majority of veterinarians are employed in private practice treating animals (75% of vets in the United States, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association).

Small animal veterinarians typically work in veterinary clinics, veterinary hospitals, or both. Large animal veterinarians often spend more time traveling to see their patients at the primary facilities which house them, such as zoos or farms.

Other employers include charities treating animals, colleges of veterinary medicine, research laboratories, animal food companies, and pharmaceutical companies. In many countries, the government may also be a major employer of veterinarians, such as the United States Department of Agriculture or the Animal and Plant Health Agency in the United Kingdom. State and local governments also employ veterinarians.

WHAT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF A VET?

Veterinarians treat disease, disorder or injury in animals, which includes diagnosis, treatment, and aftercare. The scope of practice, specialty, and experience of the individual veterinarian will dictate exactly what interventions they perform, but most will perform surgery (of differing complexity).

Unlike in human medicine, veterinarians must rely primarily on clinical signs, as animals are unable to vocalize symptoms as a human would. In some cases, owners may be able to provide a medical history and the veterinarian can combine this information along with observations, and the results of pertinent diagnostic tests such as radiography, CT scans, MRI, blood tests, urinalysis and others.

Veterinarians must consider the appropriateness of euthanasia ("putting to sleep") if a condition is likely to leave the animal in pain or with a poor quality of life, or if treatment of a condition is likely to cause more harm to the patient than good, or if the patient is unlikely to survive any treatment regimen. Additionally, there are scenarios where euthanasia is considered due to the constraints of the client's finances.

As with human medicine, much veterinary work is concerned with prophylactic treatment, in order to prevent problems occurring in the future. Common interventions include vaccination against common animal illnesses, such as distemper or rabies, and dental prophylaxis to prevent or inhibit dental disease. This may also involve owner education so as to avoid future medical or behavioral issues. Additionally, veterinarians have important roles in public health and the prevention of zoonoses.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR A CAREER IN VETERINARY

Bachelor's Degree Program

Most schools of veterinary medicine require or prefer applicants to have a bachelor's degree. While many students earn their degree in biological science, most veterinary schools don't have a preferred major as long as certain science courses are taken. These courses typically include general biology, chemistry, physics, and math. Some schools may require some more advanced science courses, such as mammalogy, biochemistry, or animal behavior.

  • Participate in volunteer programs or internships in the veterinary field. Volunteering or interning at veterinary clinics or other animal care facilities can give students an idea of what the job of a veterinarian is really like. Many veterinary programs require some experience working with animals, and volunteering can fulfill this requirement or make a student more competitive when applying. You can use these experiences to show dedication to the field of animal care and gain professional references.
  • Join a pre-veterinary club. Pre-professional clubs that focus on veterinary medicine are available at many schools. These clubs may have meetings where members discuss career topics, shadowing programs, and resources for volunteer or internship experience. Some also offer the chance to apply for scholarships that are only offered to members.
  • Take the GRE. Many schools of veterinary medicine require applicants to submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. This exam measures a person's readiness for graduate-level studies.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Each successive year in a program of veterinary medicine builds upon the previous year's curriculum. The first year or two may focus on science subjects like animal anatomy and physiology, nutrition, and virology. These and related courses lay the basic framework for understanding veterinary medicine. Some courses might be specific to an animal group.

The third-year may focus on clinical studies in which students come in to contact with living animals and practice using the knowledge and skills they've gained in the previous two years to make diagnoses and recommend possible treatments. The fourth-year is usually spent participating in applied experiences, such as practicums or externships.

  • Get involved in research projects. Some programs offer students the opportunity to be involved in research while studying for their degree. This experience may be helpful in understanding certain aspects of the veterinary field and can open up opportunities to work in research rather than a clinical setting.

TOP INSTITUTES FOR VETERINARY SCIENCE IN INDIA:

INDIAN VETERINARY RESEARCH INSTITUTE - [IVRI], BAREILLY

NATIONAL DAIRY RESEARCH INSTITUTE - [NDRI], KARNAL

VETERINARY COLLEGE AND RESEARCH INSTITUTE - [VCRI], NAMAKKAL

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES - [CVAS], BIKANER

GOVIND BALLABH PANT UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY, PANTNAGAR

ANNAMALAI UNIVERSITY, CHIDAMBARAM

BIRSA AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY - [BAU], RANCHI

BANARAS HINDU UNIVERSITY - [BHU], VARANASI

ALIGARH MUSLIM UNIVERSITY - [AMU], ALIGARH

BUNDELKHAND UNIVERSITY, JHANSI

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!

Post Comment